E5-RegioIII_Sympathie_2-12

Americans praise Germany

Postive signals for transatlantic relations.

Germany is more popular than ever before among US citizens, according to a representative survey published by the German Embassy in Washington. A total of 55% of respondents said they had an excellent or good overall impression of Germany. In 2009 this view had been expressed by only 48%. “Good old Germany” is even more popular among those who have travelled to Germany themselves (below: US citizens in front of the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin). There was also an improvement in the assessment of Germany’s role in international relations: 58% currently believe that Germany plays an important role. And 58% of Americans regard Germany as a high-tech country, up from 48% in 2009.

www.germany.info

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The Prußian Military Commander in the U.S Continental Army

By Catherine Stella Schmidt

As of yet, in Americans' perceptions Germans are either great Military Commanders or Rocket Scientists. A concept which has its origin coherently aligned to reality.

From the time that the German Cartographer Martin Waldseemüller (1470-1520) brought the New World: the United States of America on the word map, until the 21 century, each pages of our history projects the very essential role that the German immigrants have played in United States formation, development, and victories.
It also shows the Americans fascination by, and their praise for, Deutschland.

One of the greatest Military commanders who was an outstanding figure in helping the United States Army during the revolutionary war was: “Friedrich Wilhelm August Heinrich Ferdinand von Steuben (1730-1794).
A Prußian Military Commander who came to U.S and served as a Major General of the Continental Army.

Although it was in 1777 that in a meeting with Benjamin Franklin, the American Foreign Commissioners in France, General von Steuben received the official letter of acknowledgement to join the US Continental Army, the road was already open to him much earlier in 1763 when he became acquainted with Louis de Saint Germain of France.1

Upon General von Steuben’s arrival to U.S the Continental Congress found him highly impressive Military Officer that
they recommended him, immediately, to General George Washington.
He entered the Continental Army in 1778 and remained in it until 1784.
Among his various duties as a high level Officer, he was also in command of training the US Army.

His book “Regulations for the Order and Discipline of Troops of the United States” which became well known in entire U.S Army at that time, is known ‘The Army’s Blue Book’.
And thus far is considered one of the greatest Military training book among U.S Military high level experts.

Below is one of the links from the U.S army in acknowledgment of this fact.
http://www.army.mil/article/29717/After_230_years__the___039_Blue_Book__039__still_guides_NCOs/

In the U.S history, General von Steuben is celebrated as a German Commander, whose remarkable Military strategy in battles and his extraordinary skills in training the U.S Continental Army paved the path for a great victory for the United States in the Independence war.
General Von Steuben Day is celebrated with Parades, special events and celebrations every year in September across the U.S

In his remembrance, in la Fayette square Washington DC, stands Majestically the Monument of a German Commander who is known, ewiglich the American Hero: General Baron von Steuben.

Catherine Stella Schmidt,

Political Scientist and Author of:
A Philosophical Enquiry into the Concept of Liberty
Discourse on Empire
Sublime and Beautiful Europe and the United States
Immortal Beloved
The American Era and the World volume-1, 2, 3
The Role of Germany and its Armed Forces in Afghanistan
On Transatlantic Relations: the United States and Europe
The United States and Europe in Afghanistan; why should we stay
NATO and ISAF in Afghanistan
NATO and its Cyber Defense

Copy righted material

1-a French General who was appointed the Minister of war of France in 1775.

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