Living memory

What does Anne Frank’s fate have to do with hate speech and discrimination? An exhibition makes the connection clear.

Anne Frank Educational Centre opens interactive learning laboratory
Anne Frank Educational Centre opens interactive learning laboratory Bildungsstätte Anne Frank/Mara Monetti

Germany. Every 27 January, Germany commemorates the victims of National Socialism. How can we help young people to become more aware of the topic? One way is the ‘interactive learning laboratory’ of the Anne Frank Educational Centre. This Frankfurt-based institution keeps alive the memory of the young Jewish girl who was murdered by the Nazis. The Diary of Anne Frank still moves people all over the world today.

An ‘interactive learning laboratory’ on Anne Frank is to be set up in Frankfurt-am-Main in 2018. What does this mean?

Anne Frank would have been 89 years old on 12 June 2018. On that day, the Anne Frank Educational Centre in Frankfurt-am-Main, the city where she was born, will open an exhibition which aims to raise awareness, particularly among young visitors, of discrimination, racism, anti-Semitism, and the value of acting according to the principles of solidarity.

What does the learning laboratory look like?

The learning laboratory is part of the new permanent exhibition ‘Anne Frank. Morgen mehr’ (Anne Frank. More Tomorrow). At about 30 points at the exhibition, visitors can hear, for example, ‘Tales from the Secret Annex’, the family’s hiding place in Amsterdam, or delve deeper into the world-famous diary written by the Jewish girl who was murdered by the Nazis. Current topics such as bullying, hate speech and migration are also addressed.

We want to combine the history of National Socialism and the Holocaust in an innovative way with questions, problems and conflicts in present-day society.

Meron Mendel, Director of the Anne Frank Educational Centre

What is special about the exhibition?

There are no longer any exhibits in the traditional sense. Visitors are given a tablet computer for the tour. They can click on individual points and find more information, watch videos or answer questions. It’s a very lively presentation that shows Anne Frank’s life from many different angles, says curator Deborah Krieg. The story of Anne Frank, she says, is a starting point for getting young people to link the history of National Socialism and the Holocaust “in an innovative way with the questions, problems, conflicts and imbalances of present-day society,” says Meron Mendel, Director of the Educational Centre.

What are the tasks of the Anne Frank Educational Centre?

It encourages people to discuss National Socialism in Germany and is aimed primarily at the younger generation, who have practically no chance to meet contemporary witnesses. It organizes exhibitions, seminars and workshops. In addition, it supports other educational institutions and initiatives. The present permanent exhibition, which will make way for the new one, has been visited by about 120,000 school students since 2003.

Anne Frank Educational Centre in Frankfurt-am-Main

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