National newspapers

The wide range of daily newspapers in Germany is a reflection of the diversity of opinions. Overview and links to important national newspapers.

Zeitungen in Deutschland: Wichtige überregionale Zeitungen im Überblick.
dpa

BILD

With a circulation of currently about 1,5 sold  million copies daily, the BILD newspaper published by the Axel-Springer Publishing Company is Germany’s largest and most popular tabloid. The online version of this paper also gets a lot of hits each day. If you like a mixture of news, gossip, and sensationalism, be sure to bookmark bild.de.

www.bild.de

DIE ZEIT

“Independent, liberal and often at odds with the rest of the world” is how the former publisher, Countess Dönhoff, once described the weekly newspaper, DIE ZEIT, which has enriched the German newspaper scene each Thursday since 1946.

www.zeit.de

Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung

The Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung has appeared under the title of “Zeitung für Deutschland” (Newspaper for Germany) since 1949. Conservative political views, a feature section leaning towards the left and a liberal understanding of the business world - that is how one of the paper's earlier editors, Friedrich Karl Fromme, characterized the profile of the quality newspaper. These properties are also reflected in the independent online service, FAZ.NET.

www.faz.net

Frankfurter Rundschau

“Independent – but not neutral” is how the owner, publisher and editor Karl Gerold once defined the profile of the Frankfurter Rundschau (FR). Members of the editorial board of the left-liberal daily always felt a strong commitment to the principles of the welfare state and civil rights.

www.fr-online.de

Süddeutsche Zeitung

With news, features and information, the national daily Süddeutsche Zeitung (SZ – Southern Germany News) stands out with its strong positions and independent style of journalism.

www.sueddeutsche.de

die tageszeitung (taz)

“die tageszeitung” (taz –the daily newspaper) claims to provide a mixture of “relevant information, intelligent entertainment and irritation”. The national leftist daily newspaper first appearing in Berlin in 1979 is an integral part of the German press landscape today – even though the publisher has come close to bankruptcy more than once. Readers love “die taz” for its sharp-tongued and sometimes acerbic reporting.

www.taz.de

Die Welt

The conservative newspaper Die Welt keeps its readers informed of what’s going on in Germany and the world by providing analysis and comment seven days a week. As soon as an article for Die Welt, Welt kompakt or Die Welt am Sonntag has been written it appears on the joint Internet portal Welt online.

www.welt.de