The EU at a glance

 Was Europa zusammenhält
Politics, economy, science and culture: discover here what unites Europe, which role Germany plays in the EU.

Facts and figures

Symbol of unity: European flag
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This is the EU – short and simple

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Quick facts
446
million people

live in the 27 member states of the European Union.

24
official languages

reflect the cultural diversity of the European Union.

95
million EU citizens

speak German as their native language.

19
member states

have the common currency, the euro.

17
million EU citizens

are living, working or studying in another member state.

13.9
billion euros

account for the total GDP of the EU. It is also the second largest economy in the world.

15
per cent

of global foreign trade is carried out by the EU.

Europäische Institutionen
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How the EU is organized

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The EU: together for prosperity and peace
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The 5 biggest misunderstandings about the EU

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European Union

Germany and the EU

Video

Germany in the EU

Focus on Europe

A view of Europe from Germany

Despite the difficulties, the EU needs to be able and willing to represent European interests in the world as well, says Ulrich Ladurner from the German weekly newspaper Die Zeit.

Chance Europe: Studium, Arbeit und Praktika in Europa sind gefragt wie nie

Your chance in Europe

Europe offers the best prerequisites for launching a professional career. Here are all the advantages at a glance:

Covid-19 in the EU

“An incredible effort”

So far, 212,000 German an European tourists have been brought home in the wake of the corona crisis. Frank Hartmann from the Federal Foreign Office explains how this is organised.

The EU in brief

Voices

An experience for life

Young people talk about the time they have spent abroad in Europe – doing voluntary service or an internship or studying at a university.

FROM OUR PARTNERS

What unites Europe

Freedom and equality have been the very foundations of the West since the revolutions of 1776 and 1789. Why their substance is crumbling and how the idea can continue to shine.